Consultation services

In addition to our basic services, which we strive to provide at a low cost, we can also provide a more personalized experience to your particular situation, whether it be a Social Security issue, issue with Employer/Revocation of Election, or additional help with IBCs, bank accounts, international mailing addresses or passports.

We CANNOT help you with state income tax issues. Positive results have been reported from those who have established residency/mailing addresses in one of the nine states that do not have a state income tax. Those states are: Alaska, Florida, Nevada, New Hampshire, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Washington and Wyoming. You may consider following those who have experienced success.

Please send us an email describing your needs. In all cases, we will send you a separate personalized invoice, payable immediately via PayPal. See Fee Schedule below.

Also, if you have a unique passport situation, our experience can perhaps be of service to you on an a-la-carte basis. The same can be done for bank accounts, mailing addresses, etc.

NOTE: Please be as specific as you can in describing your situation via email prior to the phone consultation. List all questions. We are not mind readers. We need a very clear, concise picture of your needs and desires.

We CANNOT help you obtain a U.S. passport — the passport consultation is for passports other than the one from the United States. Please do not email us with a request seeking a U.S. passport. Consultations are for existing clients only.

SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY

 

Consulation Fee Schedule

Description
Fee
Personalized consultation (2-hour block of time)
€400 EUR
One-time fee for personalized attention (email Q&As, only for Federal Income Taxation issues, i.e. liability, Chapter 24 tax withholding, or active Notice of Deficiency issues — NO OTHER TOPICS)
€2,500 EUR

Our Mission

“It is not the function of our Government to keep the citizen from falling into error, it is the function of
the citizen to keep the Government from falling into error.”
— American Communications Association
v. Douds, 339 U.S. 382, 442 (1950)